Posted by: rdkpickle | 01.02.2017

slow down, cont’d

Some more words from other people about social media, multitasking, slowing down;

“At saturation level, social media reduces the amount of time people spend in uninterrupted solitude, the time when people can excavate and process their internal states. It encourages social multitasking: You’re with the people you’re with, but you’re also monitoring the six billion other people who might be communicating something more interesting from far away. It flattens the range of emotional experiences.

[…]

When we’re addicted to online life, every moment is fun and diverting, but the whole thing is profoundly unsatisfying. I guess a modern version of heroism is regaining control of social impulses, saying no to a thousand shallow contacts for the sake of a few daring plunges.”

Intimacy for the Avoidant“- David Brooks

And more:

“A restlessness has seized hold of many of us, a sense that we should be doing something else, no matter what we are doing, or doing at least two things at once, or going to check some other medium. It’s an anxiety about keeping up, about not being left out or getting behind.

I think it is for a quality of time we no longer have, and that is hard to name and harder to imagine reclaiming. My time does not come in large, focused blocks, but in fragments and shards. The fault is my own, arguably, but it’s yours too — it’s the fault of everyone I know who rarely finds herself or himself with uninterrupted hours. We’re shattered. We’re breaking up.

It’s hard, now, to be with someone else wholly, uninterruptedly, and it’s hard to be truly alone. The fine art of doing nothing in particular, also known as thinking, or musing, or introspection, or simply moments of being, was part of what happened when you walked from here to there, alone, or stared out the train window, or contemplated the road, but the new technologies have flooded those open spaces. Space for free thought is routinely regarded as a void and filled up with sounds and distractions.”

The Encyclopedia of Trouble and Spaciousness – Rebecca Solnit

I felt a bit of discomfort with the uninterrupted time afforded me over the recent break, never seeming to make use of it the way I’d like. On the other hand, when school is in session, I am constantly fighting the feeling of fragmented multitasking in response to a busy schedule. Do you feel this tension around being fully present in your work and relationships? Do your students? What seems to work for you to reclaim space for daring plunges?

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